Archives » February 2nd, 2006

February 2, 2006

New Window Thursday

The contractor has been out here for a few days this week to replace all our windows. The old aluminum-frame windows from 1979 that had no problem letting large quanities of cold air into the house are going away, and being replaced by low-e glass that’s actually caulked and sealed all the way around. Imagine!

Living Room Before
Our old living room window

The idea behind low-e glass is that there is a microscopic layer of metal on the glass itself, thin enough that you can still see through it but thick enough to block heat and other kinds of radiation. The intent is to keep the heat in during the winter and out during the summer, as well as to make sure the cats don’t get cooked when they’re laying in a nice patch of August sun. It’s still a double-pane window, but it holds in the heat better than triple- or quraduple-panes.

Working
The carpenter prepping the drywall for the new window frame

Plus it helps to have windows that were sealed properly. Our old living room window had come detached sometime in the last 25 years, so you could push on the glass and the frame would move away from the wall about half an inch. Having something that’s firmly attached to the wall does wonders for keeping your house warm. And, on top of that, some of the windows were cracked, or rusting in the corners, and all together they were a motley crew that just had to be let go.

Living Room After
The new window from the outside.

So they’re gone, all piled in a heap in our front yard and waiting for the clean-up crew to haul them away. In their place are nice vinyl-frame windows, with a grille of dividers to give our house a country charm that it doesn’t really deserve. Hopefully by the time these need to be replaced, we’ll be long gone.

I’ve put a bunch of pictures together into a gallery showing before and after shots from around the house. Now we just have to wait for the next heating bill to see if all this makes any difference!

Tomorrow? The roofers are coming. Which is a separate joy all by itself.